Great article! but I would caution against the claim that any activities can "strengthen" memory. In all of the psychology courses I've taken in undergrad and graduate school, professors have hammered in the fact that (as far as they know), you cannot strengthen memory.

The article that you've cited (Lambert et al., 2019) states that certain activities can help "maintain" healthy brain function during adulthood, including memory, but it doesn't say anything about improving memory. It does mention that certain targeted practices can help improve memory function during early development (i.e., childhood), and they do mention some studies on mice. They also mention that some exercises can help strengthen concentration and high-level processing during adulthood- just not memory.

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I love this!- this is exactly what the world needs right now. Your description of constantly buying cheaper things because they are a "good deal" sounds exactly like me (which I am trying to change).

I personally like to shop online more because I am more likely to find my size, and even if I'm buying a more expensive item, I'm more likely to find a coupon I can use on it.

The other thing I'll add is that even if you're getting more expensive pieces, you can still thrift them. This is a really good option for people who still need to be on a low budget. Companies like Madewell have an area on their website where they sell "pre-loved" clothes. I guess I'd advocate for both buying less, but buying used.

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Aarti Bodas

Aarti Bodas

33 Followers

PhD Student in Cognitive Development at Boston University. I write about children’s science learning, public understanding of science, writing tips and more.